I recently shared my conceptualization of God, using an analogy of one day last summer finding a tiny hummingbird’s nest with two tiny little eggs inside.

I was also recently introduced to the concept of God as a verb—which, being one who has never claimed to be atheist, but also doesn’t conceptualize God as a deity (particularly with human traits)—for the first time made sense to me.

So now, along those same lines, I just read a passage by James Allen in Mind is the Master, in the Light on Life’s Difficulties chapter, sub-chapter Light on Self-Control: The Door of Heaven, and was compelled to share:

“Self-control is the Door of Heaven; it leads to light and peace. Without it a man is already in hell; he is lost in darkness and unrest. Men inflict upon themselves far-reaching sufferings, and pass through indescribable torments, both of body and soul, through lack of self-control; and not until they resort to its practice can their sufferings and torments pass away, for it has no substitute, nothing can take its place, and there is no power in the universe that can do for a man that which he, sooner or later, must do for himself, by entering upon the practice of self-control.”

“When men both depart from and refuse to practice self-control, then they fall into the great and dark delusion of separating religion from conduct; then they persuade themselves that religion consists, not in overcoming self and living blamelessly, but in holding a certain belief about Scripture, and in worshiping a certain Saviour in a particular way; hence arise the innumerable complications and confusions of letter-worship, and the violence and bitter strife into which men fall in defence of their own formulated religion. But true religion cannot be formulated; it is purity of mind, a loving heart, a soul at peace with the world. It needs not be defended, for it is Being and Doing and Living. A man begins to practice religion when he begins to control himself.”

In addition, James Allen implores his readers to read Ralph Waldo Emerson‘s Self-Reliance, which I did, and found the final quote relevant to this idea:

“Nothing can bring you peace but yourself. Nothing can bring you peace but the triumph of principles.”

And finally, I’d like to add a relevant post I shared on Facebook back in April:

For years I’ve shared the mantra “Liberty Begins Within,” which is also one of the core tenets of the “Toward Autarchy” philosophy I was attempting to develop before being dissuaded from further participation in the liberty arena 2 years ago [upon the rise of global tyranny with barely a peep of protest from the people]…but more recently, I’m becoming profoundly astonished at how, through my ongoing personal studies, that mantra has begun to so closely correlate with “The Kingdom of God Is Within You“…[Luke 17: 20-21]

I also recently posted here that for years, one of my more ambitious endeavors has been an attempt to integrate the philosophies of liberty and spirituality. I’ve even more recently determined that that is, consciously or not, what I was attempting to accomplish with the Toward Autarchy concept. So, as my studies and writings continue, I can’t help but reconsider that reviving that endeavor, under the Toward Autarchy theme.

Hopefully, I’ll have more—much more—to share on this subject in the near future.

Rand Eastwood

Rand Eastwood is an author & blogger residing in beautiful Las Vegas, Nevada. Certified in nutrition and ancestral health, he is a healthy lifestyle advocate. He describes himself as an individualist, consensualist, sophophile, syncretist, and Autarchist. Much of his fiction—including some award-winners—is included in his collection Rolling The Bones, and he currently has an extensive novel under development, working title Primeval. To follow his work, you can subscribe to this blog (right sidebar), connect with him on Facebook, subscribe to his Substack, and follow his author page on Amazon.

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